Criminal Disagreement

One of the historical characteristics of any authoritarian regime is the criminalization of dissidents

Famous dissidents of ancient Florence

Every idea always has someone who disagrees.

This also happens on a political level: every government in history has always had people who did not appreciate its action.
Even dictatorial regimes have a percentage of dissidents. Because it is impossible to reach unanimity, it is part of human nature to have different ideas.

Diversity of ideas underlies the development of human civilization.
Not only this. In a democracy, the presence of people who do not share government policies is a fundamental pillar. Because any criticism of and, hence, debate on current policies serve to improve them and, in the event that the government proves to be ineffective, the presence of a real and vital opposition could pave the way to a government that can bring greater benefits.

Conversely, the key feature of a totalitarian state, as the word implies, is to have all citizens in full agreement with the government. In totalitarian states, those who think differently are not considered as a vital part of the debate but are marginalized if not physically eliminated.

One of the historical characteristics of any authoritarian regime is the criminalization of disagreement.
Those who thought differently from the government were not represented as an opponent of power but as an “enemy of the people”. This way, the action of marginalization and persecution was directly undertaken¬†by the citizens so as to magnify the repression.

The real problem in a democracy does not lie with dissidents. It rather arises when the power of the government becomes so unrestrained that it criminalizes those who shirk from its action.

RES HUMANA